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25

Jul

The Black Guerilla in Sociology's Classroom - print.pdf

rifams-distro:



This text is the product of a project undertaken by Greg D. Kowalski as part of a directed study at Rhode Island College under the Black Studies program.

Abstract:
In his now classic text ‘Blood in My Eye,’ George L. Jackson writes, “All revolution should be love inspired.” This directed study, and honors project by extension, will plumb the depths of Jackson’s remark by critically interrogating the ethical dimensions of Black Power and the cultural, ideological, and political interventions influenced by such a conceptual revolution. This project is meant to serve as a contribution to the insurgency and urgency of/for fresh paradigms within Sociology departments matriculating students in the study of the meaning of “race” in society. Moving beyond the rubrics of class struggle or economic exploitation, this project seeks to bring “the critique of anti-blackness,” what is designated as ‘afro-pessimism’ in Black studies, to the forefront of conversations about “race relations” in Sociology. By delineating and pushing the logic of Marxist thought (conflict theory) concerning issues of race and racism, particularly Gramsci’s theory of hegemony, this project will highlight the severe limitations of conflict theory while working intimately with the conceptual framework of Black Power, demonstrating the promise and explanatory power of Black studies in untangling tyranny in “a penal democracy.”

19

Dec

MuFucka, Hope Y’all Amused: Natal Alienation, State Violence and Social Critique in “Cartoon and Cereal”

I wrote an essay on Kendrick Lamar’s song “Cartoon and Cereal” ft. Gunplay.  Check it out. Here’s an excerpt:

While Lamar displays public support for victim-blaming discourses on antiblack violence in 2013, his past performances did not make such claims, perhaps because they occurred prior to his public rise.  I say this to say that past discourses, while they weren’t as public to the extent that his BET speech was, were focused upon the “ethics of violence”[1] which his expression spoke; one such discourse took place in the song “Cartoon & Cereal,” which takes on multiple meanings in the context of black suffering, gratuitous violence, and police power which are regular markings of normative existence in centers of urban captivity, places where the state is omnipresent but seems barely there.



[1] Woods, Tryon. “Beat it Like a Cop,” 29. 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1qH-9nw7lrNcmF3eVhVQjZCUzg/edit?usp=sharing

I might have feelings about justice, for example I feel that the killing of Oscar Grant by a BART police officer was unjust; and that the verdict in the case (involuntary manslaughter) is also unjust. But justice is not a register that I trade in as a theorist. And perhaps not even as a politico. I am interested in ethics, which is to say that I am interested in explaining relations of power. You might say that both of my books are arguing that the existence of the world, meaning the existence of the modern era, is unjust. It would be hard to find a corner of justice within an unjust paradigm, unless you made a provisional move away from explaining the paradigm. As regards the first part of your question: I believe in the spirit world; that is to say I believe that the African ancestors are still with us and can be consulted from time to time. But I would not try to calibrate the gap between what I believe and what I can explain. I don’t think that would be useful.
Reparations suggests a conceptually coherent loss. The loss of land, the loss of labor power, etc. In other words, there has to be some form of articulation between the party that has lost and the party that has gained for reparations to make sense. No such articulation exists between Blacks and the world. This is, ironically, precisely why I support the Reparations Movement; but my emphasis, my energies, my points of attention are on the word “Movement” and not on the word “Reparation.” I support the movement because I know it is a movement toward the end of the world; a movement toward a catastrophe in epistemological coherence and institutional integrity—I support the movement aspect of it because I know that repair is impossible; and any struggle that can act as a stick up artist to the world, demanding all that it cannot give( which is everything ), is a movement toward something so blindingly new that it cannot be imagined. This is the only thing that will save us.

08

Oct

so-treu:

queennubian:

fenice-argento:

From the Facebook event:
A Black person is killed every 28 hours by a security guard, police officer, or deputized White body in the United States of America(1). In a purportedly “post-racial” era, in the wake of historical and monumental civil rights activism, many thoughtful observers have noted that over time we have not experienced a diminished state of racist institutions, systems, and practices but rather quite the opposite: White Supremacist state structures have undergone unprecedented growth and strength. One aspect of this growth is the frequency of violence (excessive forced) used on unarmed Black youth; youth that, in spite of their perceived innocence, the justice system offers no protection for. This student-driven lecture and discussion of extra-judicial gratuitous violence will examine the cases of anti-Black state violence in the murders of unarmed Black youth: Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant, and Aiyana Stanley-Jones. Evidence and analysis will be presented while offering practical solutions for resistance on and off-campus. Critiques of Whiteness and White Supremacy will be offered. These critiques will allow for us create a platform for imagining new, as well as recognizing past and current, forms of resistance, and inspiring action against state violence. Presented by Greg Kowalski and Andrea M. Sterling Sponsored by L.I.F.E. (Live. Inspire. Fight. Educate!)Where: Roberts Hall Alumni Lounge—Rhode Island CollegeWhen: 4-5:30pm; Wednesday, October 9__________________________________1) Operation Ghetto Storm: 2012 Annual Report on the Extrajudicial Killing of 313 Black People http://tinyurl.com/keu22ko

for the folks in that area

oh this looks really promising, good for the students who are directing this

so-treu:

queennubian:

fenice-argento:

From the Facebook event:

A Black person is killed every 28 hours by a security guard, police officer, or deputized White body in the United States of America(1). In a purportedly “post-racial” era, in the wake of historical and monumental civil rights activism, many thoughtful observers have noted that over time we have not experienced a diminished state of racist institutions, systems, and practices but rather quite the opposite: White Supremacist state structures have undergone unprecedented growth and strength. One aspect of this growth is the frequency of violence (excessive forced) used on unarmed Black youth; youth that, in spite of their perceived innocence, the justice system offers no protection for. 

This student-driven lecture and discussion of extra-judicial gratuitous violence will examine the cases of anti-Black state violence in the murders of unarmed Black youth: Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant, and Aiyana Stanley-Jones. Evidence and analysis will be presented while offering practical solutions for resistance on and off-campus. Critiques of Whiteness and White Supremacy will be offered. These critiques will allow for us create a platform for imagining new, as well as recognizing past and current, forms of resistance, and inspiring action against state violence. 

Presented by Greg Kowalski and Andrea M. Sterling 
Sponsored by L.I.F.E. (Live. Inspire. Fight. Educate!)

Where: Roberts Hall Alumni Lounge—Rhode Island College
When: 4-5:30pm; Wednesday, October 9


__________________________________
1) Operation Ghetto Storm: 2012 Annual Report on the Extrajudicial Killing of 313 Black People http://tinyurl.com/keu22ko

for the folks in that area

oh this looks really promising, good for the students who are directing this

19

Jul

tranqualizer:

i say this all the time but if dismantling white supremacy is not a core pillar of whatever work you are doing then you need to figure that shit out and fix it

12

Jul

Son of Baldwin: Don't We Dare Forget Aiyana Jones

sonofbaldwin:

image

And just to prove to you how much we despise little black girls, Joel Rstein has reminded us not to forget Aiyana Jones:

“Voice of Detroit has a recent article on the trial http://voiceofdetroit.net/2013/06/09/family-describes-military-rai

07

Jul

Frank Ocean comes out
Tumblr:
Nicki Minaj comes out as Bi and straight up makes it look like she's eating Cassie out in her music video
Tumblr:
Beyonce, Jay-Z and Kanye West come out in support of marriage equality
Tumblr:
Numerous LGBTQI+ identified Rappers exist
Tumblr:
Macklemore:
When I was in third grade I thought I was gay because I could draw,
Tumblr:
OH MY FUCKING GOD WOW THE FIRST TIME EVER ANYONE IN HIP HOP SUPPORTS GAY PEOPLE BLACK PEOPLE ARE SO HOMOPHOBIC WOW WHAT AN AMAZING SONG I LOVE SAME LOVE<3 HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN NOH8 SUPREME COURT DEFENSE OF MARRIAGE ACT

30

Jun

Every year white people add 100 years to how long ago slavery was. I’ve heard educated white people say, ‘slavery was 400 years ago.’ No it very wasn’t. It was 140 years ago…that’s two 70-year-old ladies living and dying back to back. That’s how recently you could buy a guy.

Louis C.K. (via 30thcenturyboy)

Sylvester Magee, the (probable) last American born into slavery died in 1971.

The last living child of former American slaves, Mississippi Winn, died in 2010.

Slavery in the territory that is now the United States lasted more than 330 years. We will be 330 years removed from slavery in the year 2195.

(via jordynbesty)

This is the actual complaint against Paula Deen

karnythia:

Never again tell the lie that she’s losing sponsors because she used the N-word once during a robbery. The complaint is 33 pages long, incredibly detailed in that way you get when someone is documenting one terrible day after another, and lays out exactly what kind of toxic environment exists under the auspices of Paula Deen & her family. Sexual harassment, assault, battery, racism…this case has it all.